A ridiculous baseball rule: pitcher enters with 9-run lead and gets a save

AlwaysWrite

Well-Known Member
#1
Talk about a ridiculous Major League Baseball rule. Obviously, a relief pitcher deserves a "save" if he enters a close game with his team in the lead and he shuts the door on the opposing team. But last weekend (on June 23), Tampa Bay Rays reliever Austin Pruitt was credited with a "save" even though his team was leading 14-5 when he entered the game to begin the seventh inning.

Technically, according to Rule 10.19 of the Official Rules of Major League Baseball, he "earned" a save because the rule states that a save is credited when a pitcher meets all four of the following conditions: (1) He is the finishing pitcher in a game won by his team; (2) He is not the winning pitcher; (3) He is credited with at least ⅓ of an inning pitched; and (4) He satisfies one of the following conditions: (a) He enters the game with a lead of no more than three runs and pitches for at least one inning; (b) He enters the game, regardless of the count, with the potential tying run either on base, at bat or on deck; (c) He pitches at least three innings.

Pruitt did pitch three innings in a game that wound up 15-5, but according to the ridiculous rule, he would have received a save, even had he given up nine runs, 12 hits, six walks and three wild pitches, as long as he finished the game. Most of the time, a team's so-called closer has to work hard to preserve a late lead, but how effective does a pitcher need to be to preserve a nine- or 10-run lead? A rule change is in order
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WAMO

Well-Known Member
#2
I THINK THAT PARTICULAR PART OF THE RULE (c) IS SET BECAUSE MOST RELIEF PITCHERS DONT PITCH 3 FULL INNINGS. BUT GETTING CREDIT FOR A SAVE IS A BIT OF A STRETCH. CLOSER MUST HAVE WORKED A BUNCH OF INNINGS LEADING UP TO THAT POINT.
 

AlwaysWrite

Well-Known Member
#3
I THINK THAT PARTICULAR PART OF THE RULE (c) IS SET BECAUSE MOST RELIEF PITCHERS DONT PITCH 3 FULL INNINGS. BUT GETTING CREDIT FOR A SAVE IS A BIT OF A STRETCH.
Dear WAMO:

I think it's more than "a bit of a stretch" when a pitcher gets a save when he enters the game with a nine-run lead -- or anything more than a four-run lead, for that matter.
 

AlwaysWrite

Well-Known Member
#4
There's another situation that is ridiculous with regard to the rules involving saves and blown saves.

If a team has a one-run lead in a save situation, and a reliever gives up three consecutive walks to start the inning, then is replaced, and an "inherited runner" scores on an error or passed ball, the second reliever is tagged with a "blown save" and the totally-inept pitcher is credited with a "hold" even though walking all three men he faced.

Even if the second reliever does nothing wrong -- for instance, being the victim of an error or passed ball -- and retires the side in order, he gets a "blown save" ... and that makes no sense.
 

AlwaysWrite

Well-Known Member
#5
The ridiculous "save" situation happened again last night (Aug. 28). Matt Andreise of the Tampa Bay Rays entered the game with an 8-0 lead and was credited with save for pitching the final three innings of a game eventually won by the Rays 12-0.

[The Rays had little trouble defeating the inept Kansas City Royals, who now have been shut out in four consecutive games, after previously having lost a series to Cleveland by scores of 4-0, 4-0 and 12-0. The Royals had been contending for an American League playoff berth. Talk about giving up on the season!]
 
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