What would a baseball player with a season like this make in today's market?

AlwaysWrite

Well-Known Member
#1
Everyone knows that the price/value of almost everything is going UP, UP and UP some more, but consider the following with regard to major-league baseball salaries.

Keep in mind that the MINIMUM SALARY for ANY major-league baseball player is now $507,500 -- a ridiculous figure, in my opinion. However, looking back a half-century ago, in 1966, consider the salary of Frank Robinson, who played for the Baltimore Orioles.

In the 1966 season, with a salary of $64,000, Robinson WON THE TRIPLE CROWN (batting average, home runs and runs batted in), led the league in runs scored, on-base percentage and slugging percentage, was league MVP (his second MVP in six seasons) and World Series MVP as Baltimore won four straight, the final game 1-0 on a Robinson home run.

So what was his salary the following season? A "paltry" $100,000 -- which would be considered "chicken feed" in comparison to today's top-to-bottom salaries.
 

Greg T.

Well-Known Member
#2
You have to consider the value of the dollar in both cases when trying calculate a player's worth in todays market. Back in 66 a gallon of gas was 32 cents, milk, 99 cent/gal, average home was $23k, and out national debt was $330 B. A postage stamp was 5 cents, and best of all, the average new car was $3,200. I think it's fair to say, given the devaluation of the dollar, sports figures are extremely over paid today.
 

AlwaysWrite

Well-Known Member
#3
You have to consider the value of the dollar in both cases when trying calculate a player's worth in todays market. Back in 66 a gallon of gas was 32 cents, milk, 99 cent/gal, average home was $23k, and out national debt was $330 B. A postage stamp was 5 cents, and best of all, the average new car was $3,200. I think it's fair to say, given the devaluation of the dollar, sports figures are extremely over paid today.
Dear Greg T:

Obviously, it's true that the cost of everything has gone up in a half-century, but except for the national debt, the prices of everything else you quoted hasn't risen more than tenfold. On the other hand, the absolute-worst major-league baseball player's "value" has increased more than five times the market value of a triple-crown winner who was also MVP of the league and the World Series. And I don't have to tell you how much more differential there is between Frank Robinson's pay and the salaries of today's top-level players.
 

Greg T.

Well-Known Member
#5
Only because the public continues to support that high pay by attending games, watching on tv, buying caps/jerseys/sports memorabilia, etc.
This is exactly on target. The fans make the heroes. When people are willing to pay $100.00+ for a ticket to a football game, or whatever baseball prices are these days, it only supports the insane wages these people make. Let's make one clear before I get railroaded. I am all for free enterprise, and the right of people to make a living in whatever fashion they desire. But you can't sit there and cry and scream about the ridiculous money being paid to sports figures, all the while you're sitting in the bleachers eating $5.00 hot dogs and drinking $8.00 beers after paying $50.00 to $100.00 for a ticket.
 

WAMO

Well-Known Member
#6
ITS TO LATE TO CHANGE IT. AND ITS GOING TO GET WORSE. IN THE VERY NEAR FUTURE YOU WILL HAVE TO PAY TO SEE YOUR TEAMS HOME GAMES ON TV EVEN IF THEY ARE SOLD OUT.
 

AlwaysWrite

Well-Known Member
#7
The salaries are absolutely ridiculous. Albert Pujols and Prince Fielder are both "earning" (if you call it that) $24 million this season, but they are batting .193 and .190, respectively. And Troy Tulowitzki is batting .162 with a salary of $20 million.

Such players have incentive clauses in their contracts if they reach certain statistical (or award) levels ... but there SHOULD be contract provisions that they have to give part of their salary up if they fail to reach certain statistical levels.

If the average American had job performances at the extreme sub-par levels as Pujols, Fielder and Tulowitzki, they would be out of job pronto!
 

AlwaysWrite

Well-Known Member
#8
Whether he hits .190 -- as he is currently doing -- or even lower, Albert Pujols' salary WILL CONTINUE TO RISE BY $1 MILLION A YEAR UNTIL 2021, when he will make $30 MILLION at age 41.

THE INFLATED PAYSCALE GOES UP while PERFORMANCE GOES DOWN, DOWN, DOWN.

How would you like a job with such guaranteed money -- without having to perform a lick to "earn" it?
 

AlwaysWrite

Well-Known Member
#9
If all major-league baseball, NFL, NBA and NHL salaries were cut in half, 95% of the athletes would still be overpaid while still getting rich at the same time.
 

WAMO

Well-Known Member
#10
BUT THAT WOULD ALSO CUT TICKET, FOOD, SOUVENIR, "BEER" AND A NIGHT OUT WITH YOUR FAMILY PRICES. SOUNDS LIKE A GOOD TRADE OFF TO ME.
 

AlwaysWrite

Well-Known Member
#11
BUT THAT WOULD ALSO CUT TICKET, FOOD, SOUVENIR, "BEER" AND A NIGHT OUT WITH YOUR FAMILY PRICES. SOUNDS LIKE A GOOD TRADE OFF TO ME.
The owners and players get fat (salaries) while the lowly fans pay ridiculous prices to see the fat-cat (and often far overrated) players perform.
 

Greg T.

Well-Known Member
#12
The owners and players get fat (salaries) while the lowly fans pay ridiculous prices to see the fat-cat (and often far overrated) players perform.
Yes, that is the case. So, shame on the fans for caving to these prices. This is a classic example of unions and how they screw the average person. If a player were to be paid on performance, incentives would undoubtedly change the players' perspectives of the game. One either produces numbers in pursuit of more money, or he cruises himself back to the minors. This would certainly make for more interesting and exciting games, overall. Also, without having to shell out multi-millions on a player who turned out to be mediocre, ticket prices would level off to something most families can afford. But when the union dictates multi-year contracts with guaranteed $millions, where is the incentive to perform? It's not about "love of the game' anymore.
 

AlwaysWrite

Well-Known Member
#13
Yes, that is the case. So, shame on the fans for caving to these prices. This is a classic example of unions and how they screw the average person. If a player were to be paid on performance, incentives would undoubtedly change the players' perspectives of the game. One either produces numbers in pursuit of more money, or he cruises himself back to the minors. This would certainly make for more interesting and exciting games, overall. Also, without having to shell out multi-millions on a player who turned out to be mediocre, ticket prices would level off to something most families can afford. But when the union dictates multi-year contracts with guaranteed $millions, where is the incentive to perform? It's not about "love of the game' anymore.
... and, of course, each player now has an agent -- sometimes an unscrupulous agent -- who is out for himself in order to get a nice percentage of the player's lucrative contract.
 

Greg T.

Well-Known Member
#14
... and, of course, each player now has an agent -- sometimes an unscrupulous agent -- who is out for himself in order to get a nice percentage of the player's lucrative contract.
Yup. And there are more people to blame than the fans for paying the inflated prices. The owners are just as bad for allowing this to continue. All the have to say is "bite me", and offer the entire triple A team a nice little sum to come and play.
 
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